Actions for Preventing COVID-19 – Safety Procedures To Preventing The Spread Of COVID-19

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Actions for Preventing COVID-19 – Safety Procedures To Preventing The Spread Of COVID-19

Your actions can help safeguard you, your family, and your neighbourhood from COVID-19’s severe illness in various ways. To assist you in determining when to take precautions to protect yourself and others, the CDC’s COVID-19 Community Levels report on the prevalence of severe illness in the area where you live.

Prevention Actions to Use at All COVID-19 Community Levels

In addition to basic health and hygiene practices, like handwashing, CDC recommends some prevention actions at all COVID-19 Community Levels, which include:

  • Staying Up to Date with COVID-19 Vaccines
  • Improving Ventilation
  • Getting Tested for COVID-19 If Needed
  • Following Recommendations for What to Do If You Have Been Exposed
  • Staying Home If You Have Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19
  • Seeking Treatment If You Have COVID-19 and Are at High Risk of Getting Very Sick
  • Avoiding Contact with People Who Have Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19

Build Your COVID-19 Plan

Additional Preventive Measures as Needed Additional preventive measures can be taken at any level. Still, the CDC advises considering them in specific situations or at medium or high COVID-19 Community Levels.
Using a mask or a respirator increases the gulf between us using a mask or a respirator. Masks are designed to catch the droplets and debris you cough, sneeze, and inhale.
Masks come in many different varieties. Different masks offer varying degrees of protection. Respirators, like the N95, are designed to fit snugly against the face and filter out particles, including the virus that causes COVID-19, to protect you.
To prevent spreading germs to others, they can also stop the droplets and particles you breathe in, cough, or sneeze out. Compared to masks, respirators (like the N95) offer a higher level of protection.
It is crucial to choose a mask or respirator that you can wear correctly, fits snugly over your mouth and nose, offers adequate protection, and is comfortable for you when using one (such as the N95).
Increasing the gulf between us, Virus particles can be present in the tiny particles people breathe out. You are more likely to be exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19 the more people you are close to. You might want to stay away from crowded areas or maintain a safe distance from other people to prevent this potential exposure.
Additionally, these measures safeguard those susceptible to developing severe COVID-19-related illnesses in environments with numerous exposure risks. Additional Preventive Measures as Needed Additional preventive measures can be taken at any level.
Still, the CDC advises considering them in specific situations or at medium or high COVID-19 Community Levels. Using a mask or a respirator increases the gulf between us using a mask or a respirator Masks are designed to catch the droplets and debris you cough, sneeze, and inhale. Masks come in many different varieties. Different masks offer varying degrees of protection.
Respirators, like the N95, are designed to fit snugly against the face and filter out particles, including the virus that causes COVID-19, to protect you. To prevent spreading germs to others, they can also stop the droplets and particles you breathe in, cough, or sneeze out. Compared to masks, respirators (like the N95) offer a higher level of protection.
It is crucial to choose a mask or respirator that you can wear correctly, fits snugly over your mouth and nose, offers adequate protection, and is comfortable for you when using one (such as the N95). Increasing the gulf between us, Virus particles can be present in the tiny particles people breathe out.
You are more likely to be exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19 the more people you are close to. You might want to stay away from crowded areas or maintain a safe distance from other people to prevent this potential exposure.
Additionally, these measures safeguard those susceptible to developing severe COVID-19-related illnesses in environments with numerous exposure risks.

Put together your COVID-19 plan to have all the necessary information on hand if you get sick with COVID-19. Download, edit, save and share your plan with your family, friends, and healthcare provider.

Maintaining Current COVID-19 Vaccines The COVID-19 vaccine aids in the body’s development of defences against the COVID-19 virus.
Even though the virus that causes COVID-19 can occasionally infect vaccinated individuals, staying up to date on COVID-19 vaccinations significantly reduces the risk of developing severe illness, requiring hospitalization, or passing away from COVID-19.
According to the CDC, everyone eligible should get a booster shot and continue to receive COVID-19 vaccinations, especially those with compromised immune systems. If you have a severe allergy to the COVID-19 vaccine, immunodeficiency, or both: Ask your doctor if you qualify for the drug EVUSHELDTM, which you can take to prevent COVID-19 exposure or a positive COVID-19 test.
Your doctor will administer this medication, which contains two distinct antibodies, every six months. EVUSHELDTM may provide less defence against specific Omicron variant strains. Even if you receive EVUSHELDTM, you must practice multiple forms of prevention. See more information to create a COVID-19 plan and safeguard against infection.
Fact Sheet for Patients, Parents, and Caregivers Regarding EVUSHELDTM EUA Where to get the COVID-19 vaccine locally: Call 1-800-232-0233, text your ZIP code 438829, or conduct a search on vaccines.gov. Increasing Airflow and Spending Time Outside The accumulation of virus particles in indoor air can be avoided by improving ventilation (moving air into, out of, or within a room) and filtration (trapping particles on a filter to remove them from the air).
By improving ventilation and filtration, you can avoid contracting and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. Try to avoid being inside whenever you can and spend time outside instead. Inside, compared to outside, viral particles spread between people more easily. The following actions can enhance filtration and ventilation: Opening windows is one way to get as much fresh air as possible.
Increasing the air filtration in your heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system by, for example, changing your filters frequently and utilizing filters that are well-fitted and offer higher filtration. Utilizing transportable HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) cleaners. Improving airflow by turning on exhaust fans and using additional fans.
Setting your thermostat to “ON” rather than “AUTO” will guarantee that your HVAC system will continuously circulate and filter air. You can determine how much you can improve ventilation in your home or place of education using the interactive tools provided by the CDC.
Taking indoor pursuits outside Because virus particles do not accumulate in the air as much outside as they do inside, participating in outdoor activities lowers your risk of contracting COVID-19. Think about moving more group activities outside as the COVID-19 Community Level rises. Some organizations, like schools, may be eligible for financial assistance to improve ventilation.
Obtaining a COVID-19 Test If Required If you experience symptoms of COVID-19, get tested. You can find out if you have the virus that causes COVID-19 by taking a viral test. Rapid tests and laboratory tests are the two different viral test types. Saliva or samples from your throat or nose may be used in these tests. If you are aware of your COVID-19 infection, you can take steps to protect yourself and lessen your risk of spreading the disease to others.
The CDC’s Viral Testing Tool is a mobile-friendly online tool that poses questions and suggests solutions based on your answers. You can use it to interpret the significance of your test results. Additional ways to access tests include: COVIDtests.gov offers free self-testing orders.
The local health departments can also provide free tests. Up to 8 free self-tests from participating pharmacies and providers are covered by Medicare Part B if you have it, including if you’re enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan.
The price of purchasing self-tests may also be covered by private health insurance. Go to the FDA’s website to view a list of approved tests. Contact your local health department, a community testing site, or a healthcare provider for more options. The following are suggestions for what to do after being exposed. You might have contracted the virus if you were around someone who had COVID-19.
For advice on what to do if you are exposed, consult the CDC. This entails testing, keeping an eye on your symptoms, and donning a high-quality mask indoors around others for ten days, including inside your home.
Staying at Home If COVID-19 Is Suspected or Confirmed Even if you don’t have any symptoms, COVID-19 can still be transmitted to others if you have it. If you experience symptoms, get checked out and remain at home until you receive the results. If you tested positive (even if you have no symptoms), adhere to the CDC’s advice on isolation.
These suggestions include using a high-quality mask indoors around other people for an extended period and remaining at home and away from others for at least 5 days (possibly more, depending on how the virus affects you).
If you have COVID-19 and are at a high risk of becoming seriously ill, you should seek treatment. You might be qualified for the many free and efficient treatments that are currently available. Get in touch with your doctor, the health department, or the Community Health Center to find out about treatment options.
Do not wait! For treatment to be effective, it must be started soon after the onset of symptoms. Check if there is a Test to Treat location in your neighbourhood if you don’t have prompt access to a healthcare provider. At one location, you can get tested, get a prescription from a doctor (on-site or via telehealth), and then have it filled.
Keeping Distance from Those Who Have COVID-19 Suspected or Confirmed Whether or not they appear ill, avoiding contact with COVID-19 carriers can lower your risk of contracting the virus. If at all possible, stay away from COVID-19 patients until they can safely come out of home isolation. In some cases, you might not be able to avoid a person with COVID-19, or you might want to assist in their care.
Use as many preventive measures as you can in those circumstances, such as washing your hands frequently, donning a high-quality mask as directed, enhancing ventilation, and avoiding close contact with anyone who is ill or who has tested positive. Highest Page

Prevention Actions to Add as Needed

Some additional prevention actions may be done at any level, but CDC especially recommends considering in certain circumstances or at medium or high COVID-19 Community Levels.

  • Wearing Masks or Respirators
  • Increasing Space and Distance

Wearing Masks or Respirators

Masks are made to contain droplets and particles that you breathe, cough, or sneeze out. A variety of masks are available. Some masks provide a higher level of protection than others.

Respirators (for example, N95) are made to protect you by fitting closely on the face to filter out particles, including the virus that causes COVID-19. They can also block droplets and particles you breathe, cough, or sneeze out, so you do not spread them to others. Respirators (for example, N95) provide higher protection than masks.

When wearing a mask or respirator (for example, N95), it is most important to choose one that you can wear correctly, that fits closely to your face over your mouth and nose, that provides good protection, and that is comfortable for you.

Increasing Space and Distance

Small particles that people breathe out can contain virus particles. The closer you are to a greater number of people, the more likely you will be exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19. To avoid this possible exposure, you may want to avoid crowded areas or keep your distance between yourself and others. These actions also protect people at high risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 in settings with multiple exposure risks.

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